The 2020 Census is Now Live. 
9 Questions. 10 Minutes. $20,000.

Claim your fair share at
my2020census.gov

Until the U.S. Census Ends

You may have heard a lot about this 2020 Census thing.

It runs from March 12 through August 14 and it’s a big deal. Here’s why you really want to fill it out.

The Census is a 9-question confidential survey that takes 10 minutes to complete. It determines where and how federal money and power are distributed. The more San Franciscans who take part, the bigger our fair share of both.

When you fill out the Census, each person in your household (including you) brings $20,000 into your community over the next ten years. Fill it out and protect your voting power (this year, California could lose a seat in the House of Representatives—which we definitely don’t want to happen).

 

Everyone has the right to safely participate. Yes, everyone—citizen or not—even babies count. And despite what you may have heard, there is no citizenship question on the 2020 Census.

Spend 10 minutes answering 9 questions, and money comes into our communities for affordable housing, healthy food, healthcare, public schools, fostercare, free meals, job training, essential emergency services, roads, preschools, and more.

It’s time to get your fair share.
It’s time to COME TO YOUR CENSUS.

Get Smart About the
2020 Census

Co-Create with Artists Around the City:
Upcoming Events

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KQED Forum

DATE TO BE ANNOUNCED

KQED Forum

Come to Your Census: Who Counts in America? Art & Civic Experience

DATES TO BE ANNOUNCED

Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Come to Your Census: Who Counts in America? Art & Civic Experience

Behind the Campaign

COME TO YOUR CENSUS

The Creative
The Artists
The Font

The Creative

This arts-driven campaign—established through a process of interviews and collaborations with key community-based organizations—reflects an  ideology of equity and plurality. The creative platform, COME TO YOUR CENSUS was developed under the guidance of Art+Action Director of Messaging + Creative,  Amy Schoening,  with SF-based creative syndicate Partners in Crime and Amy Finn of Agency by Others. The campaign typography and artwork selection was brought to life by MCCALMAN.CO design studio, led by S.F. artist George McCalman (who also is one of the campaign’s participating artists). The first iteration of the campaign—in the four official languages of San Francisco: English, Chinese, Spanish, and Tagalog—was unveiled on the JCDecaux kiosks along San Francisco’s Market Street corridor, courtesy of San Francisco Arts Commission (SFAC), for Martin Luther King Jr. Week. Art+Action’s online open-source toolkit offers versions of select posters re-imagined by Robert Saywitz. Forthcoming iterations of the campaign creative will harness the talents of Stoller Design Group. 

Miguel Arzabe
‘Here’
Joel Daniel Philips
‘Charlie Lee #3’
Clare Rojas
‘untitled’
George McCalman
‘Glide’
Masako Miki
‘Conversation with Plates’
Marcela Pardo Ariza
‘Congregation’
Hung Liu
‘Sisterhood’

Stephanie Syjuco
‘Color Checker (Pileup 2)’
Andrew Li
‘Buses, Bikes, Scooters and Cars’
Emory Douglas
‘Father’s Love’

The Artists

Artists including Marcela Pardo Ariza, Miguel Arzabe, Emory Douglas, Andrew Li, Hung Liu, George McCalman, Masako Miki, Joel Daniel Philips, Clare Rojas, and Stephanie Syjuco—representing a myriad of San Francisco’s communities and neighborhoods—are featured in the first edition of the campaign, which was unveiled along San Francisco’s Market Street corridor for Martin Luther King Jr. Week.

Joel Daniel Phillips
Masako Miki
Emory Douglas
Marcela Pardo Ariza
Hung Liu
George McCalman

Andrew Li

Miguel Arzabe
Stephanie Syjuco
Clare Rojas

The Font

Tré Seals, founder of Studio Seals and Vocal Type Co.—who seeks to diversify design with custom-typography highlighting a piece of history from a specific underrepresented race, ethnicity, or gender—created the MARTIN font, inspired by the Memphis Strike of 1968, in which Martin Luther King Jr. joined workers in demanding recognition for their union, better wages, and safer working conditions. While in the original “I AM A MAN” posters, the ‘AM’ was highlighted, in the campaign, YOUR is emphasized, inviting viewers to action by communicating that completing the census is something you rightfully deserve and by which you are empowered.



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